Former Polish President Lech Walesa has said he does not admit his guilt over the alleged false testimony filed by him over the suspected cooperation with security services.

The news comes as Poland's deputy prosecutor general said on Tuesday that the country's Institute of National Remembrance (IPN) had launched a criminal investigation against Walesa, suspecting him of false testimony in the case of collaboration with Poland's Communist rulers.

"One more time for Poland, Europe and the entire world, I state that I have never cooperated with [security] services of the Polish People's Republic [Poland's official name under the Communist rule] and [I] have never sided with communists," Walesa said Wednesday, as quoted by the RMF FM radio station.

The Polish politician added that in the course of the investigation it had been revealed that the documents allegedly proving his cooperation with the security services had been falsified.

"I have the IPN's documents, I have the court's ruling, I have other letters of the IPN, which say about the falsification of the documents and now they say that it is not true," Walesa stressed.

The ongoing scandal has been developing since February 2016. At the time Lukasz Kaminski, the head of the National Remembrance Institute (IPN), a state body responsible for researching Soviet-era crimes, told reporters that a batch of discovered documents proved that Walesa was an informer for secret services between 1970 and 1976.

Walesa was said to have been assigned the codename "Bolek" and was paid for his services to the country’s Communist authorities, according to IPN. Later, he actively campaigned against the regime and served as president of the Polish state from 1990 to 1995.

Sputnik